Convert an XHTML form to a JSON object, then use jQuery’s AJAX methods to send the data to the backend

Jan 29
2009

I had a project at work that almost drove me insane tonight. When it comes to Javascript, forget what you know about other languages, and get in the mode of: “all objects are hashes”.

Case Scenario:

You have a form with lots of dynamically created input fields. Instead of a normal submit button post, you want to send the data to the backend using AJAX.

Problem:

After hours of Googling, you just can’t find information on dynamically populating a JSON object. You also want a clean and simple way to grab all that form data, put it in a JSON object, and then submit it with jQuery‘s wonderfully simple AJAX methods.

Example Solution:

XHTML from a dynamically generated form
I left some code out for simplicity, but just imagine it’s there. The inputs below are added dynamically, and can be infinite.

<form id="invite_users">
    <fieldset>
        <input name="users[0][name]" type="text">
        <input name="users[0][email]" type="text">
    </fieldset>
    <fieldset>
        <input name="users[1][name]" type="text">
        <input name="users[1][email]" type="text">
    </fieldset>
    <fieldset>
        <input name="users[1][name]" type="text">
        <input name="users[1][email]" type="text">
    </fieldset>

    <!-- ...etc...etc.. -->

    <a href="javascript:void(null)" id="#submit_form">Submit</a>
</form>

jQuery Goodness

Here is the sweet part. In this example, we just iterate through all the input fields dynamically, and place them in a JSON object — which is what jQuery’s ajax method uses to send the data back to the server.

$(document).ready(    function() {
    $("#submit_form").click(function() {
        var data = {}

        $("form#invite_users > fieldset > input").each(function() {
          data[$(this).attr("name")] = $(this).val();
        });

        $.post("post_form.php", data, function(returnData) {
          alert("Thank You!");
        });
    });
});

Easy enough?

But wait!  There’s an even better way.  With the above example, we don’t account for complex element types passed in the request ( ie, radio boxes, check boxes, file inputs ).  Once again, jQuery simplifies things even further with serializeArray():

    $("#submit_form").click(function() {
        var data = $("form#invite_users").serializeArray();

        $.post("post_form.php", data, function(returnData) {
            alert("Thank You!");
        });
    });

Hope this helps others out there! Leave a comment on your thoughts!

Visit Other Sites!

Find me on other sites...

Archives

All entries, chronologically...

Pages List

General info about this site...