AdKeeper Raises $35 million in second round funding!

Jan 03
2011

I joined AdKeeper several months ago – it’s so far been a blast, and has really nailed the startup-junkie sweet spot in me! With a press announcement today, it just got a lot more interesting…

As we pound out our goals and deadlines on the code-front, where I dwell, the rest of the company has been hard at work refining the vision and pushing the marketing. Today we announced our second round funding, a whopping $35 million, led by Oak Investment Partners – bringing the total raised to $43 million.

So, I get this question alot, in fact, my sister just asked me last night: “What are you guys building, Chris?”. Lets save your eyes, and give you a fun video this time:





By the way, my sister’s response via phone was “I save ads all the time, I just usually book mark them and look for them later, but this makes it easier – I really think people will use this”. I feel the same way!

You can also find out more at www.adkeeper.com.

You can also watch more videos (Q&As, fun commercials, and more) at our YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TheAdKeeper

Ubuntu + Compiz

Jun 12
2009

This is actually from awhile ago ( almost a year ), but I thought I’d share. It’s my desktop pc, running Ubuntu 8.04 and Compiz Fusion engine.

To be honest, it was a fun exploration for the novelty, but these days, the most I really use from the effects engine is the magnifier to help people standing over my shoulder focus on whatever I’m demonstrating.

Pretty cool none the less! Read up at Compiz Fusion and Ubuntu

Setup a webcam security system with Ubuntu Linux and Motion

May 17
2009
Snap from Office Security Cam

Snap from Office Security Cam

So, now that I’m in Morgantown – my home is too small to comfortably work on side gigs and personal projects – especially now that my family is getting bigger with the baby!  I’ve been using the office space I leased out more and more.  While exploring video conferencing with Matt last week, I had the thought “wouldn’t it be cool to have a security camera in the office?”.  So I did just that, and it’s actually quite easy for Ubuntu linux users.

What you need:
  • Ubuntu Linux ( I was using 8.04.1 at the time of installation )
  • one or more USB web cameras
What you can do:
  • Motion detection – record video/and or frames if there is motion.
  • Snapshot intervals – take time interval snapshots regardless of motion detection.
  • Live video IP stream in mjpeg format.
  • Specify recorded video to be saved in your choice mpeg, avi, flv, swf format.
  • When motion exists, have frames and videos draw a box around the specific motion for more obvious recognition of subtle movements ( this actually shows the shadow of the janitor near the door around 6 a.m. every morning – I wouldn’t have noticed otherwise! )
  • Easily send all data to a backup server in a variety of ways – I keep it simple by saving data to my Dropbox directory, a wonderful cross-platform data syncronization and sharing utility.
Steps:

1.  Plugin your webcam.
For me, the Logitech QuickCam® Pro 9000 worked right out of the box, and was only 105$.

2.  Install Motion – software motion detector, and turn it on.

sudo apt-get install motion
sudo motion

3. Configure Motion

Everything really works out of the box with this – but isn’t quite organized to my liking, and probably not yours either. Global configuration is located inside /etc/motion.conf ( You’ll notice there are multiple threadN.conf files in this directory – which can be used for custom configured individual cameras if you are setting up more than one ).

Note: Be sure to restart the Motion server everytime you make a configuration change.

sudo /etc/init.d/motion restart

Take a look at the files, they are well documented. Below are a few helpful configurations to get your data organized quicker:

#/etc/motion/motion.conf

# Locate and draw a box around the moving object.
locate on

# Draws the timestamp using same options as C function strftime(3)
text_right %Y-%m-%dn%T-%q

# Text is placed in lower left corner
text_left SECURITY CAMERA %t - Office

Organize the filesytem to save data by date, instead of all in one directory.

# File path for snapshots (jpeg or ppm) relative to target_dir
snapshot_filename %Y%m%d/camera-%t/snapshots/hour-%H/camera-%t-%v-%Y%m%d%H%M%S-snapshot

# File path for motion triggered images (jpeg or ppm) relative to target_dir
jpeg_filename %Y%m%d/camera-%t/motions/hour-%H/camera-%t-%v-%Y%m%d%H%M%S-%q-motion

# File path for motion triggered ffmpeg films (mpeg) relative to target_dir
movie_filename %Y%m%d/camera-%t/movies/hour-%H/camera-%t-%v-%Y%m%d%H%M%S-movie

# File path for timelapse mpegs relative to target_dir
timelapse_filename %Y%m%d/camera-%t/timelapses/hour-%H/camera-%t-%Y%m%d-timelapse

4.  (Optional)  Setup a backup solution

a. Easy solution, get and install Dropbox — instructions on the Dropbox site.  Then update your motion.conf to save to your Dropbox directory:

#/etc/motion/motion.conf
...
target_dir /path/to/dropbox/security_camera
...

b. A more granular solution is to take advantage of hooks configurable in motion.conf. Using these, you can create bash scripts to do anything your heart desires ( like trigger a silent alarm on motion detection outside business hours ). Available hooks: on_event_start, on_event_end, on_picture_save, on_motion_detected, on_movie_start, on_movie_end.

If you have wput installed, you can easily upload files to a remote backup server with these hooks:

#motion.conf
...
on_picture_save wput ftp://user@pass@server %f
...

However, this solution is somewhat less secure, as it uses FTP. In a future post I will detail how to secure this up using encrypted transfer and phrase free keys. ( Stay tuned! )

5. Live feed

This comes working out of the box with Motion. Check out your live stream in your web browser by navigating to: http://localhost:8081

That’s it! Webcam security made easy :-)

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